How to Make Money as a DJ Outside the Decks

It is fun to make money doing what you love. For most DJs, DJing is their passion, and they cannot imagine life without doing it. Therefore, being able to make money DJing is just icing on the cake. Most people don’t do it for the money. They do it for love. But they have managed to make a full time living doing it and even gain fame and influence.

A good example is Calvin Harris, whose real name is Adam Wiles. They started as a grocery worker but kept putting in the work, and today he is amongst the highest-paid DJs. Okay, I’m not saying you will become the next Calvin Harris, although nothing is impossible, you could end up making a full-time income from your DJing gigs. So to help you get there, here are a few ways you can make money as a DJ outside the decks.

Teach people how to become a DJ.

Many people would love to DJ, whether professionally or just for fun. If you can identify people interested, you could make some cool cash teaching people how to become a DJ. Who better to teach this than a DJ. You can promote yourself on social media as well as using word of mouth to get the word out.

Find work in the music industry

It is a route that can help you gain experience while also providing a steady income and job stability. If you’re still starting, you could apply to clubs and local radio stations as a DJ or in the office. It would be an excellent learning curve, plus you could grow and own a slot as a mixing DJ, which could land you bigger and better gigs down the line.

Get a sponsor.

If you’re able to build a brand, you can leverage this by finding a sponsor. Find a local DJ-store and ask them for sponsorship. It could be an excellent way of gaining publicity. They could also provide financial sponsorship, and in return, you could help them market their brand as well by including their name in your mixes and marketing materials.

Monetize your blog.

It can be quite a fulfilling thing running a blog — both personally and financially. Sharing your experience and tips as a DJ on your blog can attract a lot of followers as well as make you some real money if you know how to monetize your following.

There’s a lot written on how to monetize a blog or social media following. Just Google it. You will find strategies such as running Adsense, selling merchandise, getting endorsement deals, and so much more.

Be a mobile DJ.

Not everyone is cut out to be a bar or club DJ. Some people enjoy the idea of exploring and going where the action is. Mobile DJs don’t have a particular spot where they play. They play everywhere such as in weddings, birthdays, clubs and more. It is an excellent way to make some extra income.

Sell merchandise to your followers.

Okay, following from the point about monetizing your blog. You can create branded merchandise and sell it to your fans. Yes, it could be anything from t-shirts to branded headsets. You could create an e-commerce site for selling your merchandise.

There are a few ways to earn money outside the deck as a DJ. Did we miss anything? Well, go ahead and tell us what you think. Are you a DJ? How are you making extra money? Please share.

How Much Does a DJ Event Cost?

 

How Much Does A DJ Event Cost?

Unless you are a fully operational nightclub, the question of how much a DJ costs will probably leave you scratching your head. Even if you are a club owner, you might be confused by the drastic changes in quotes between DJs. That £25 DJ might have had you dancing around your office, even if your dancefloor was empty, but that £25,000 quote might have had you going from scratching your head to scratching your own records.

There must be a reason why DJ fees can vary so much?

Let us help iron out some of the details so you understand the noise behind the costs of a DJ, and even help aspiring DJs know how to market and conduct themselves in the future. Here are 6 of the most influential factors behind a DJ’s pricing:

Travel

A Dj might be able to spin records, but they certainly can’t spin the laws of physics. Traveling takes time and money. While a lot of DJs expect to go a little out their way to get booked on some occasions, if you are requesting a DJ to travel to your venue and therefore spend money on fuel, public transport, parking and even accommodation, you should be prepared to pay these additional costs. On some occasions, travel costs may come under expenses in the client’s final invoice and for that reason, these details should be negotiated beforehand to avoid shock bills.

Minimum Fees

Sme DJs and their management may have minimum fees in place which usually does not reflect their skill level, but rather their personal narcissism or greed. You know something does not add up if your entry level DJ has a £1000 ‘’call out charge”. Unfortunately, this also occurs in the celebrity world where famous people who have never DJ’ed since their drunken 30th birthday cocktail party then go on to charge venues colossal fees to simply stand behind some decks and ‘’DJ’’ for 30 minutes.

Equipment Hire

A shock to many of you, but a DJ does not come complete with a full sound system and lighting. These are additional costs that the DJ or their management may add to the overall costs. Hiring such equipment is not cheap but the costs may vary as much a as the costs of a DJ do.

Set Length

Just like you get paid in time at most other jobs i.e. hourly rates, the same applies to DJing. The length of time behind the decks will determine the overall cost of the DJ. Most sets will last anywhere in the region from 1 to 3 hours, and any time after that will be charged at an increased rate – a sort of overtime if you wish. It is essential that you iron out the DJ’s set length before you make a payment.

DJ Popularity

This may appear to be the most glaringly obvious reasons, but sometimes it can be overlooked when booking DJs without celebrity status.

Naturally, booking one of the most prestigious and popular DJs in the world is going to set you back quite a bit, and I’m sure the organisers of Tomorrowland and other world-renowned festivals have banks sweating over moving large sums of money. Yet, the popularity of a DJ without some type of online fame often goes unconsidered by those seeking a good DJ for their events.

Aspiring DJs take note! It is not uncommon for companies to stump up extra cash for a DJ with a big social media following and hype around them, while rejecting negotiations with a very good DJ with plenty of experience but no “popularity points”.  In fact, companies have been known to pay popular DJs double what their more experienced, but lesser popular, counterparts are paid.

Communication

When looking for a DJ, it is not unexpected that you want to be in contact with them to discuss your preferences and any special requests and information you would like to share with them. A full service on the DJ’s part is not just about performing a great set. It is about conducting yourself professionally and liaising with clients – or getting your agent to. We recommend avoiding DJs who are reluctant to listen to your wishes or gives the impression that they only care about the pay cheque at the end of the evening. DJs who do offer a full service usually cost more because they offer a better service; this is something that should not be sniffed at.

 

Whatever your budget, we are sure there is the right DJ out there for your event. Please remember to consider the above points when breaking down your DJ’s quote, to make sure you pick wisely!